(Source: japotecture)

8:31

(Source: reggiemoo)

8:31

theblacksophisticate:

feminism5ever:

When people say “culture is meant to be shared” I’m literally like ???? Because that has literally never been the purpose of any culture. Culture is about identity, community and family. It’s about tradition. It is not and has never been about “sharing”.

Say it!

8:30

just-watch-me-hachiko:

rainydayraised:

A girl becomes embarrassed after giving flowers to a female US soldier on duty in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul. 16 April 2007

The caption changes so many assumptions

8:30

(Source: terriblefate)

8:30

sparklehime:

sparklehime:

look at this card

i really don’t want a popular post please i just wanted you guys to LOOK at the card

8:30

I’m the best of the best. I’m Blair Waldorf.

(Source: stuartmary)

8:28

8:27

(Source: gurrenlagging)

8:27

(Source: eggzakery)

8:04

anime is such a shitty show

(Source: sadcumpng)

8:04

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

Although the Quran “[a]llows a believer to abstain from fasting if he or she is far from home or involved in strenuous work,” many enslaved Muslims demonstrated transcendent piety by choosing to fast while bonded. In addition to abstaining from food and drink, enslaved Muslims held holy month prayers in slave quarters, and put together iftars - meals at sundown to break the fast - that brought observing Muslims together. These prayers and iftars violated slave codes restricting assembly of any kind.

For instance, the Virginia Slave Code of 1723 considered the assembly of five slaves as an “unlawful and tumultuous meeting”, convened to plot rebellion attempts. Every state in the south codified similar laws barring slave assemblages, which disparately impacted enslaved African Muslims observing the Holy Month.

Therefore, practicing Islam and observing Ramadan and its fundamental rituals, for enslaved Muslims in antebellum America, necessitated the violation of slave codes. This exposed them to barbaric punishment, injury, and oftentimes, even death. However, the courage to observe the holy month while bonded, and in the face of grave risk, highlights the supreme piety of many enslaved Muslims.

Ramadan was widely observed by enslaved Muslims. Yet, this history is largely ignored by Muslim American leaders and laypeople alike - and erased from the modern Muslim American narrative.

Ramadan: A centuries-old American tradition | Al Jazeera (via simhasanam)

I want everyone to read this. The general (though unspoken) conception is that Ramadan and Islam in general is a religious practice that began in great numbers in the West with the influx of Arab and South Asian immigrants and that is far from the truth and a grave injustice to the contributions of Black Americans. Islam has been here and its foundation began with them.

(via maarnayeri)

8:04

(Source: harunoz)

8:02

(Source: chilton-computing.org.uk)

8:02

licoricewall:

玉城ティナ (Tina Tamashiro)八木アリサ (Arisa Yagi): ViVi

8:02

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